An Introduction to Energy

Energy comes in only two primary forms. Potential energy and kinetic energy. Potential energy is any stored form of energy. This can take many different forms, which we will discuss in a moment. Kinetic energy is the energy of motion. When something is moving it possesses kinetic energy. Examples of kinetic energy include a planet Read More …

The Jo Weapon

  The Jo is a short staff weapon commonly slightly over four feet in length and about one inch in diameter. Different martial arts system use slightly different lengths and diameters, but the above measurements are pretty typical for the Jo. A Jo can be made from several different types of wood or can be Read More …

Angular and Tangential Velocities

Angular Velocity is a measure of how quickly something moves about a fixed point. In other words, how quickly something moves about the circumference of a circle. The speed of this movement is normally measured in radians or degrees per unit of time, most commonly seconds (though if you were measuring the movement of stars Read More …

Hyoshi (Timing)

Timing is another key element of training in Tensoku Ryu. There is an age-old question in the martial arts that goes, “Is it better to know how to move, or when to move?” People with limited experience will often answer that “how to move” is most important. People with significant experience will knowingly answer that Read More …

Seiza

Seiza is a formal sitting posture that one may use whenever sitting in the Dojo (especially in formal situations or when you will be sitting for a relatively short period of time). It is the posture used at the start and end of belt presentation ceremonies and is used extensively in Iaido (Katana) practice. Students Read More …

Etiquette (Reishiki)

The martial arts are chock full of various customs and practices that form a system of etiquette observed to varying degrees by different martial arts systems and martial arts schools. These customs can vary greatly from one martial art to another. Some styles pay very little attention to etiquette while others are deeply immersed in Read More …

Blocks, Checks, and Parries

There is often some confusion about the differences between blocks, checks, and parries. This is understandable since these are often employed using similar movements and because what starts out as a block could turn into a check or parry. Likewise a parry might evolve into a block or check. Let’s begin by describing each type Read More …

Front and Back

You would think the concept of front and back would be quite straight forward. Unfortunately, it can be confusing. Within Tensoku Ryu we have established well-defined practices for carefully noting what is the front and what is the back. Why do we get so involved in defining what should seem pretty obvious? Look at the Read More …

Directional Terminology

Throughout our training materials we refer to various directions, angles, and positions. We will cover the most salient of these terms in this article so that you have one central place to visit when you encounter a term you no longer recall or that is foreign to you. You can sort the various tables by Read More …

Japanese Anatomical Names

Up through the Brown Belt rank students focus much of their Tensoku Ryu training on Japanese martial arts concepts. Later this changes, but a predominant them in much of the Mudansha instruction involves Japanese terms and nomenclature. Much of this involves terminology related to body parts. Usually this on the same level as typical English anatomical Read More …

The Octagon

One of the most fundamental conceptual elements of the Tensoku Ryu system is the Octagon. We use this concept to help define movement directions in multiple ways. The most fundamental use is to imagine the Octagon projected onto the floor. Now we can establish some common movement patterns and points of reference. The Octagon Model Read More …