Kihonteki Kata

Students who are studying to achieve the Yellow Belt ranking must learn and become proficient at performing two Tensoku Ryu . These Kata (forms) are designed to reinforce knowledge of fundamental blocking and striking methods but also provide training on some stance work, guard positioning, , and angles. These two Kata were created by Richard Read More …

Kihonteki Nidan Kata

is intended to provide a mechanism for the practice and perfection of various . This is sometimes referred to as the Striking Set, but the Kihonteki Nidan name is preferred. Strikes within the Kata should be practiced in each of the following three different ways: Each strike should be delivered very slowly and deliberately with Read More …

Kihonteki Shodan Kata

Kihonteki Shodan is an introductory Kata intended to focus attention on angles, two basic stances, and fundamental blocks that every student should master. The Kata is also used to drill home the importance of having the hands in proper guard position. This Kata is sometimes referred to as the Blocking Set, but the Kihonteki Shodan Read More …

Moto Dachi

Moto Dachi is a general fighting stance in which the feet are set comfortably wide (a little longer than the length of your shin) and the knees are slightly bent.  In most martial arts styles the front foot faces directly forward and the back foot is rotated toward angles 5 or 7 (depending on which leg Read More …

Iaigoshi Dachi

Iaigoshi Dachi (Kneeling Stance) is similar to the but there are a few differences. The first is that the back knee descends and rests on the floor. The second is that the stance is narrower (left to right) than the Soft Bow Stance, and the third is that the back knee rests about one fist’s Read More …

Ippon Dachi

Ippon Dachi is the One-Legged-Stance. In this stance one leg is raised and the foot is brought adjacent to the pedestal leg. The raised foot may be placed in several different positions, depending upon what is required or advantageous at the moment. The most common raised foot positions are: Tucked behind the pedestal leg with Read More …

Renoji Dachi

Renoji Dachi (the “L” stance) is formed by moving the back leg slightly in behind the front leg until the heels are in alignment (essentially forming the letter “L”). The front foot faces forward (to local angle 1) and the back foot is turned 90° to the side. The distance between the front and rear Read More …

Ura Neko Ashi Dachi

This stance, also called a Reverse Cat Stance, is related to the , but has the foot with little pressure moved slightly behind the other foot, rather than placed in front of it. The rear foot does not slide behind the other foot, but rather is simply moved backward from a natural stance position until Read More …

Kokutsu Dachi

The Kokutsu Dachi (Back Stance) might be considered the reverse of the Zenkutsu Dachi. In the Kokutsu Dachi the front leg is held relatively straight (it can range from significantly bent to perfectly straight, depending on the depth of the stance and its intended application) while the back leg is significantly bent. Perhaps 40% of Read More …

Shiko Dachi

In Shiko Dachi (the Square Stance) both feet are moved outward a little beyond shoulder width. Both feet point outward from your center at about 30° (the feet point in opposite directions). The knees are bent significantly and your weight is caused to sink straight downward so that weight is evenly distributed on both legs. Read More …

Kiba Dachi

The Kiba Dachi is also frequently called a Horse Rider’s Stance. It is often simply called a Horse Stance, a phrase which while linguistically inaccurate is still quite commonly used. The Kiba Dachi is very similar to the except that the feet are pointed toward your local angle 1 and are therefore parallel to one Read More …