Yellow Belt Front Kicks

In this post I’ll discuss the kicks targeted toward angle one of the . Tensoku Ryu students must demonstrate proficiency at these kicks in order to obtain the Yellow Belt () ranking. These are all kicks in which a single strike is delivered. In the Yellow Belt students learn every stationary single kick in our curriculum. Read More …

Ippon Dachi

Ippon Dachi is the One-Legged-Stance. In this stance, one leg is raised and the foot is brought adjacent to the pedestal leg. The raised foot may be placed in several different positions, depending upon what is required or advantageous at the moment. The most common raised foot positions are: Tucked behind the pedestal leg with Read More …

Heiko Dachi

In this stance (often called the Parallel Stance) the feet are parallel to one another and placed about ½ shoulder-width apart or directly below the hips. In many cases it may be advantageous to have the feet roughly shoulder width apart. The hands may be in many different positions depending upon circumstances, but the hand position Read More …

Heisoku Dachi

Heisoku Dachi (sometimes called the Ready Stance) is the fundamental attention stance in most martial arts styles, including Tensoku Ryu. In this stance the heels and toes come together and the arms fall at full natural extension along the outside of the thighs. The fingers are normally straight, but not rigidly straight, and the palms Read More …

Rooting

Rooting is the process of forcing an opponent (or yourself) to drop and distribute weight down and through the legs in such a way that the legs cannot readily move from that position. A classic example is when you force someone back slightly so that all of his or her weight is evenly distributed on Read More …

Fundamental Kicking Skills

Within Tensoku Ryu we recognize that there are innumerable uses for kicks. One of the primary purposes is to deliver a punishing strike to an opponent. This is one of the more difficult methods of kick delivery and it is an area where we place great emphasis. We are quite demanding about kicking effectively and Read More …

Where is Your Backbone?

If I ask students to point to their backbone they invariably move a finger behind their back (around the waist or over the shoulder) and point to the middle of their back. They are absolutely correct. It is hard to fault them for properly locating their spine. But very few students ever point to their Read More …