Yellow Belt Front Kicks

In this post I’ll discuss the kicks targeted toward angle one of the . Tensoku Ryu students must demonstrate proficiency at these kicks in order to obtain the Yellow Belt () ranking. These are all kicks in which a single strike is delivered. In the Yellow Belt students learn every stationary single kick in our curriculum. Read More …

Moto Dachi

Moto Dachi is a general fighting stance in which the feet are set comfortably wide (a little longer than the length of your shin) and the knees are slightly bent.  In most martial arts styles the front foot faces directly forward and the back foot is rotated toward angles 5 or 7 (depending on which leg Read More …

Iaigoshi Dachi

Iaigoshi Dachi (Kneeling Stance) is similar to the but there are a few differences. The first is that the back knee descends and rests on the floor. The second is that the stance is narrower (left to right) than the Soft Bow Stance, and the third is that the back knee rests about one fist’s Read More …

Ippon Dachi

Ippon Dachi is the One-Legged-Stance. In this stance one leg is raised and the foot is brought adjacent to the pedestal leg. The raised foot may be placed in several different positions, depending upon what is required or advantageous at the moment. The most common raised foot positions are: Tucked behind the pedestal leg with Read More …

Renoji Dachi

Renoji Dachi (the “L” stance) is formed by moving the back leg slightly in behind the front leg until the heels are in alignment (essentially forming the letter “L”). The front foot faces forward (to local angle 1) and the back foot is turned 90° to the side. The distance between the front and rear Read More …

Ura Neko Ashi Dachi

This stance, also called a Reverse Cat Stance, is related to the , but has the foot with little pressure moved slightly behind the other foot, rather than placed in front of it. The rear foot does not slide behind the other foot, but rather is simply moved backward from a natural stance position until Read More …

Kokutsu Dachi

The Kokutsu Dachi (Back Stance) might be considered the reverse of the Zenkutsu Dachi. In the Kokutsu Dachi the front leg is held relatively straight (it can range from significantly bent to perfectly straight, depending on the depth of the stance and its intended application) while the back leg is significantly bent. Perhaps 40% of Read More …

Shiko Dachi

In Shiko Dachi (the Square Stance) both feet are moved outward a little beyond shoulder width. Both feet point outward from your center at about 30° (the feet point in opposite directions). The knees are bent significantly and your weight is caused to sink straight downward so that weight is evenly distributed on both legs. Read More …

Kiba Dachi

The Kiba Dachi is also frequently called a Horse Rider’s Stance. It is often simply called a Horse Stance, a phrase which while linguistically inaccurate is still quite commonly used. The Kiba Dachi is very similar to the except that the feet are pointed toward your local angle 1 and are therefore parallel to one Read More …

Zenkutsu Dachi

This stance (also commonly called a Hard Bow Stance) is a mid-level stance that places one leg forward of the other. The feet are spread at least shoulder width apart (usually wider, up to a 45° alignment on the ). The front leg is bent and the back leg is straight (often rigidly straight). Both Read More …

Presentation Ceremony

Whenever we wish to present something of importance to a practitioner we hold a Presentation Ceremony. These are public ceremonies which other practitioners, families, and friends may observe, photograph, and record. The most common use for a Presentation Ceremony is to bestow a newly earned ranking belt upon a student. Other nearly identical ceremonies may Read More …

Seiza

Seiza is a formal sitting posture that one may use whenever sitting in the Dojo (especially in formal situations or when you will be sitting for a relatively short period of time). It is the posture used at the start and end of belt presentation ceremonies and is used extensively in Iaido (Katana) practice. Students Read More …

Hachiji Dachi

In the Hachiji Dachi (Natural Stance) the feet are about shoulder width apart and the toes point outward at about 30°. The knees are generally straight but not locked. The hands can be in several different positions, depending on circumstances. Weight should be evenly distributed along the entire bottom of the feet. The stance derives Read More …

Heiko Dachi

In this stance (often called the Parallel Stance) the feet are parallel to one another and placed about ½ shoulder-width apart or directly below the hips. In many cases it may be advantageous to have the feet roughly shoulder width apart. The hands may be in many different positions depending upon circumstances, but the hand position Read More …