Chikama, Ittoma, Toma Ma Ai

refers to the engagement distance between yourself and an opponent. How you might elect to move can be determined by the magnitude of this distance. There are three primary distances that we consider when deciding how to move. Chikama Chikama (or Chika Ma) refers to a short distance. This usually means that the opponent is Read More …

Bunkai

In Japanese Bunkai means disassembly, dismantling, or analysis. In mathematical terms it refers to factorization. When used in a martial arts context it usually refers to analysis, explanation, or justification for a movement or series of movements. In essence it means knowing why and ultimately the purpose for performing a sequence of actions. But the term Read More …

Inducement

Within the Tensoku Ryu system it is considered to be inappropriate and a violation of our basic principles to goad or otherwise chide a person into a physical confrontation. We do not wish to engage in name calling, challenges, or other practices that may cause someone to unnecessarily attack us. If someone is harassing us Read More …

An Introduction to Energy

Energy comes in only two primary forms. Potential energy and kinetic energy. Potential energy is any stored form of energy. This can take many different forms, which we will discuss in a moment. Kinetic energy is the energy of motion. When something is moving it possesses kinetic energy. Examples of kinetic energy include a planet Read More …

Fundamental Physics

Physics represents a key area of study in the martial arts. No motion is possible without one or more fundamental laws of physics being involved somehow. Let’s explore a few of these fundamental laws and how they may apply to some common martial arts movements. Newton’s Laws of Motion Perhaps the most fundamental laws deal Read More …

Angular and Tangential Velocities

Angular Velocity is a measure of how quickly something moves about a fixed point. In other words, how quickly something moves about the circumference of a circle. The speed of this movement is normally measured in radians or degrees per unit of time, most commonly seconds (though if you were measuring the movement of stars Read More …

Disproportionality

Disproportionality refers to doing something and then doing something related with a different degree of commitment. This is often applied to both speed and , but it can apply to and a great many other aspects of your training as well. When applied to speed you might move at one speed (say 75% of full Read More …

Rotational Delivery

Within Tensoku Ryu when we issue a block we want to ensure the block makes contact with the opponent using what we refer to as rotational delivery. This method of blocking provides many benefits often not considered or available with typical blocking methodologies. We will cover these basic delivery mechanisms for this blocking style and Read More …

Hyoshi (Timing)

Timing is another key element of training in Tensoku Ryu. There is an age-old question in the martial arts that goes, “Is it better to know how to move, or when to move?” People with limited experience will often answer that “how to move” is most important. People with significant experience will knowingly answer that Read More …

Ma Ai (Distance)

Ma Ai refers to distance, but more importantly it suggests an awareness of distance. You will need to study distance and distancing a great deal. You need to know instantaneously if your opponent is in range, and if so, what strikes or maneuvers you might employ against them at their current (or future) range. Furthermore, you Read More …

Front and Back

You would think the concept of front and back would be quite straight forward. Unfortunately, it can be confusing. Within Tensoku Ryu we have established well-defined practices for carefully noting what is the front and what is the back. Why do we get so involved in defining what should seem pretty obvious? Look at the Read More …

The Destroy Concept

Destroy or destruction is the final escalation level in the Tensoku Ryu ETD Model. We utilize this level of the model when escaping and thwarting options are not available to us for some reason. Let me start off by saying emphatically that Destroy does NOT imply that you should kill your opponent. This is absolutely Read More …

ETD Model

In Tensoku Ryu we have a core concept that we refer to as Escape, Thwart, and Destroy, often abbreviated as ETD.  These can be thought of as levels of escalation, engagement, or conditions of necessity.  Like the , there are many different perspectives from which this concept can be viewed and it will take a Read More …

The Thwarting Concept

The second level of engagement in our ETD Model involves thwarting or disrupting an attack. The important distinction here is that you have not been able to successfully escape prior to an attack and now must deal with the initial attack and/or subsequent attacks from your opponent. The primary goal here is to disrupt or Read More …