Anatomy – Muscular System

We continue our anatomical studies by exploring the human muscular system. Students will explore muscle types, muscle tissues, muscle functioning and interactions, muscle groups, muscle metabolism, and the various muscles found in the body – particularly those that control movement of major areas of the body.

This is perhaps the most complex area of anatomical studies in our art to date (there are other more complex areas later). Take your time and read each article with care. You will find a tremendous amount you can later utilize to control your own actions and to manipulate and control the actions and behaviors of others. You will find it most beneficial to read these articles multiple times and to study each carefully on every read-through.

You may also find numerous third-party resources useful in your studies. You are likely to find that any examination of a muscle or muscle group benefits from different perspectives or viewpoints. We encourage you to examine any of the multiple online three-dimensional anatomical websites that allow you to explore different areas of the human body in great detail. Sites you may find useful include www.biodigital.com (requires registration), www.innerbody.com, www.getbodysmart.com, and www.kenhub.com (among a great many others).  There are also numerous mobile device apps that provide reference material in a more immediately accessible and interactive form. A quick Internet search using the term ‘human anatomy app’ and the type of mobile device will yield a great many apps (some paid, some free) you may find quite useful in your anatomical studies.

You will find that using an app or 3D website can greatly accelerate your understanding of the various muscles and their underlying attachment structures. More robust apps and websites can also help you study other areas of the human anatomy in greater detail. All of these apps will, at a minimum, provide you with an additional perspective that may make it easier to grasp our anatomical discussions.

We start with a basic understanding of muscle composition, metabolism, and control. Later we explore the major muscles and muscle groups and how they provide structural movement.

Brown Belt Anatomy

Cardiac muscle and skeletal muscle have a great many similarities. They also have a number of significant differences. We will primarily cover the differences in this article. We assume that you ...
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In this article we will cover muscles that control movements within the arm, wrist, and hand. We will first cover movement of the forearm. This is relatively straight forward as it ...
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Muscles can be classified or thought of in several ways. Classifications may refer to the muscle shape, size, function, use, or orientation. We will cover some of the most common ...
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Many different muscles help control movements in the upper arm. The thorax serves as a major anchor point for each of these muscles. The most substantial anchor points in the ...
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The muscles of the hip are in some ways similar to the muscles of the shoulder. Numerous muscles induce movements of the legs and torso while using the bones in ...
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Lower Leg Muscles The muscles of the lower leg reside in four facial compartments. A fascia surrounding each compartment serves to contain the compartment muscles and separate them other nearly structures. The lower ...
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We have previously discussed many of the muscles found in the torso. The muscles previously discussed involve movement of the shoulders, arms, hips, and legs. We will mention these muscles ...
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Skeletal muscles typically attached to one or more bones via a bundle of collagen fibers called tendons. Skeletal muscles can contract in size which results in a pulling force being ...
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Smooth muscle is found in organs and blood vessels throughout the body. Because these muscles help with organ function they cannot be controlled by conscious thought. The autonomous nervous system ...
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