Green Belt Kata

Within the Green Belt Curriculum you will learn three versions of the Passai Kata. Like most Kata the origins of these forms are quite murky. Many martial arts styles refer to this Kata series as Bassai. Many attribute the origins of the Kata to ancient Chinese martial artists, while others suggest the Kata originated in India. These Kata were widely practiced in Okinawa and later in Japan. They were brought into wide practice in Japan by Gichin Funakoshi. And to dispel any initial misconceptions, no this Kata has nothing to do with the Sai weapon.

Passai is often interpreted to mean storming, penetrating, or capturing a place of strategic value. This often is construed to mean storming a fortress. The Kata has many additional name variations (such as Pal Che, Basahee, and others) used within various countries and martial arts systems. Each has a slightly different variation for the meaning of these forms. We’ll generally use the term “storming the fortress” to describe these Kata, but you should not become too dogmatic about the interpretation. Many other completely rational meanings can be associated with these Kata.

There are three Passai Kata that we study in Tensoku Ryu. These are Passai Sho, Passai Dai, and the less frequently studied Passai Gwa. Sho roughly translates, in this context, to lesser or beginning, while Dai refers to large or great. You will study these forms in the order presented above.

You will also practice several weapons Kata. These forms will include Kata for both the Sai and Nunchaku weapons. Each of these Kata can take a significant amount of time to master, but this time can be reduced by studious exploration of the various drills described earlier for these weapons.

Kata

The Passai Kata (also commonly called Bassai Kata) can be generally characterized as using movements that are fast, powerful, brutal, focused, and crisp. Once you have reached some level of ...
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There are several movement sequences that are found across multiple Passai Kata, including many other versions of these Kata that we do not study. Each common sequence warrants discussion, which ...
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This version of these Kata is also called Matsumura no Passai after Matsumura Soko, the  person to whom the earliest version of this Kata is attributed. Matsumura was a martial ...
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For your edification a version of the Passai Dai Kata similar to those practiced by styles such as Kissaki Kai and Kosho Shorei Ryu Kempo is provided below. You will ...
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The Passai Sho (Bassai Sho) Kata has a great many different variations practiced by numerous martial arts styles. Some styles, particularly styles such as Shotokan Karate (who study Bassai Sho) ...
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Again we provide you with an alternate version of this Kata. Once more you are neither required to study nor demonstrate this Kata and it will not be part of ...
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This version of the Passai Kata (also commonly called Koryu Passai or Passai Guwa) was originally the Passai Sho version practiced by Itosu Anko. This version was not brought forward ...
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The two Sai Kata in our curriculum were created by Richard Munson. These Kata focus on development of Sai usage and handling skills as well as practical considerations when the ...
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The primary purpose of this [Kata is to provide a practice vehicle for Sai handling. There is a good deal of focus on dynamically changing the grip on the weapon ...
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The Nidan version of the Sai Kata is more fluid and flowing than the Shodan version. It is assumed that your basic handing skills are sound so much of the ...
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There are two Nunchaku Kata that must be done with great proficiency for your ranking examination. These Kata incorporate most of the wrapping, spinning, striking, and passing skills discussed earlier ...
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This first Nunchaku Kata focuses primarily on common spins and passes used in typical combinations. The Kata is performed in its entirety on the right side, and then repeated in ...
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The primary purpose of this Kata is to provide a series of movements that allow the student to practice continual flowing movements using the Nunchaku. If you are not yet familiar ...
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