Kihonteki Nidan Kata

Kihonteki Nidan is intended to provide a mechanism for the practice and perfection of various Atemi. This Kata is sometimes referred to as the Striking Set, but the Kihonteki Nidan name is preferred. Strikes within the Kata should be practiced in each of the following three different ways:

  1. Each strike should be delivered very slowly and deliberately with great tension and power in the arms and torso. This allows for controlling the precise movement of the strike so as to perfect the extension and retraction mechanisms for each blow. It also works to build great strength in the arms, upper torso, and to a lesser extent, the lower torso and legs.
  2. All of the strikes delivered in any given direction are thrown in a continuous manner at a constant speed. The speed can be slow at first, but should gradually be increased until all strikes in a given direction can be thrown quite rapidly. This helps develop fluidity of movement, fast muscle twitch movements, and the ability to deliver multiple strikes in short order.
  3. Strikes are delivered with varied timing. One might deliver a sequence of three strikes by throwing each as completely separate strikes. This same striking combination might be performed by throwing the first strike, pausing slightly, and then delivering the next two strikes in rapid succession. Likewise this same combination of strikes might be delivered by throwing the first two strikes in quick succession, pausing, and then delivering the third strike. Finally, any striking combination could be thrown as a rapid sequence of all strikes at full speed. This pattern works to more realistically develop the striking patterns that might be used in a conflict. For best effect a different strike timing pattern should be used when facing any new direction in the Kata. Over time students should work to avoid using the same striking pattern at each different angle in the Kata.

In a ranking examination you will be asked to perform method one above. You may optionally be asked to perform either option two or three above (but not both). You should be generally competent at all three methods prior to a ranking examination – each is extremely important in your development as a martial artist.

Please keep the following in mind when performing this Kata.

  • Both fists must remain tightly closed except for the short duration required to deliver some of the open hand strikes. Upon completion of an open hand strike the hand should immediately close again.
  • Hands that are not currently blocking must be in an effective guard position.
  • When transitioning from one stance angle to another it is usually beneficial to pass through a temporary Heisoku Dachi as you move your foot to the next location.
  • When performing option two or three above, strikes should be delivered briskly and then returned immediately to an effective guard position.
  • The front hand should always return to a front guard position, and the back hand should always return to a rear guard position.
  • When striking with the back hand it will be necessary to rotate the body forward somewhat during the strike and then rotate the body back as the back hand returns to a rear guard position.
  • As with most Kata, neither foot should lose contact with the ground (mat) at any time during the form.
  • The Kata establishes static stance positions at each angle. Students should keep in mind that these static stances are used primarily as a way to perfect these postures. In a real conflict stances are seldom established and maintained for more than a fraction of a second.
  • Atemi names are provided in Japanese where relevant.
  • Practice the Kata sometimes with very low stances and at other times with more moderate stances. Both have intrinsic benefits.
  • Ensure you pay very close attention to the quality of your stances and the effectiveness of your stance transitions. This is a critical area that will be closely evaluated during ranking examinations.

Below please find video information and a detailed written step-by-step procedure for performing this Kata. Both will aid you in learning and perfecting your version of this form.

Kihonteki Nidan Video

Kihonteki Nidan Procedure

StepMovement
IchiBegin by facing Octagon angle 1 with your feet together in Heisoku Dachi and your hands falling comfortably at your sides. Traditionally you bow to the person in front of you. Now present your opening salutation.
NiStep with the right leg to angle 7 (A7) and establish a Migi Sochin Dachi[/glossary[ facing angle 1. Perform the following sequence of movements to angle 1:
1.        Migi Sochin Dachi and Migi Jodan Kizami Tsuki
2.        Migi Zenkutsu Dachi and Hidari Jodan Gyaku Tsuki
3.        Migi Sochin Dachi and Migi Jodan Shotei Uchi
4.        Migi Zenkutsu Dachi and Hidari Jodan Shotei Uchi
5.        Migi Sochin Dachi and Migi Jodan Ura Tsuki
6.        Migi Zenkutsu Dachi and Hidari Jodan Ura Tsuki
SanLook to angle 4 and then step forward with the left leg to angle 5 and establish a Migi Sochin Dachi facing angle 4. Perform the following sequence of movements to angle 4:
1.        Migi Sochin Dachi and Migi Jodan Tettsui Uchi
2.        Migi Zenkutsu Dachi and Migi Jodan Tettsui Uchi
3.        Migi Sochin Dachi and Migi Jodan Soto Shuto Uchi
4.        Migi Zenkutsu Dachi and Hidari Jodan Soto Shuto Uchi
5.        Migi Sochin Dachi and Migi Jodan Tate Ken Tsuki
6.        Migi Zenkutsu Dachi and Hidari Jodan Tate Ken Tsuki
YonLook to angle 2 and then step back with the right leg to angle 8 and establish a Migi Sochin Dachi facing angle 2. Perform the following sequence of movements to angle 2:
1.        Migi Sochin Dachi and Migi Jodan Uraken Tsuki
2.        Migi Zenkutsu Dachi and Hidari Jodan Ura Ken Tsuki
3.        Migi Sochin Dachi and Migi Jodan Hiraken Tsuki
4.        Migi Zenkutsu Dachi and Hidari Jodan Hiraken Tsuki
5.        Migi Sochin Dachi and Migi Chudan Nukite Tsuki
6.        Migi Zenkutsu Dachi and Hidari Chudan Nukite Tsuki
GoLook to angle 3 and then step back with the right leg to angle 5 and establish a Migi Sochin Dachi facing angle 3. Perform the following sequence of movements to angle 3:
1.        Migi Zenkutsu Dachi and Hidari Chudan Angled Fist
2.        Migi Zenkutsu Dachi (no transition needed) and Hidari Jodan Kakuto Uchi
3.        Migi Zenkutsu Dachi (no transition needed) and Hidari Jodan Nihon Nukite Tsuki
4.        Migi Sochin Dachi and Migi Chudan Angled Fist
5.        Migi Sochin Dachi (no transition needed) and Migi Jodan Kakuto Uchi
6.        Migi Sochin Dachi (no transition needed) and Migi Jodan Nihon Nukite Uchi
RokuLook to angel 1 and then step back with the right leg to angle 6 to establish a Migi Sochin Dachi facing angle 1. Perform the following sequence of movements to angle 1:
1.        Migi Zenkutsu Dachi and Hidari Gedan Tate Haito Uchi
2.        Migi Sochin Dachi and Migi Chudan Ippon Ken Tsuki
3.        Migi Zenkutsu Dachi and Hidari Jodan U-Hand Strike
4.        Migi Sochin Dachi and Migi Gedan Tate Haito Uchi
5.        Migi Zenkutsu Dachi and Hidari Chudan Ippon Ken Tsuki
6.        Migi Sochin Dachi and Migi Jodan U-Hand Strike
NanaStep back with the left leg to angle 8 to establish a Heiko Dachi facing angle 1. Perform the closing salutation. Yame.

See Also

The Octagon
Etiquette (Reishiki)

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